Tackling child labour on Malawi’s tobacco farms

A campaign against child labour in Malawi has resulted in 2,000 children being removed from hazardous tobacco farms – but more needs to be done.
6 June 2011: A campaign against child labour in Malawi has resulted in 2,000 children being removed from the country’s hazardous tobacco farms – but more needs to be done, blogs Plan child rights advisor McDonald Mumba.
My country is still ranked amongst the world’s 20 poorest, with a Human Development Index of 0.337, which is even lower than the average for under developed countries. So it’s no surprise that family poverty is rampant and forces young children into labour in various sectors, such as the tobacco industry.
A comprehensive child labour survey in Malawi revealed that 37% of children aged between  5 and 15 were involved in labour. Of these, 53.5% worked in agriculture – including fishing, forestry and hunting – but most were working in tobacco production.
In my country there are two major underlying causes of child labour in the tobacco sector – family poverty and the quest for minimising costs on the part of the grower. Tobacco growers obviously like to reap high profits and find it easier to hire children as they are paid less for the same work done by an adult.
By |2018-10-30T15:00:05+00:00October 29th, 2018|Labour News|Comments Off on Tackling child labour on Malawi’s tobacco farms